Annual Dinner Meeting

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This event has passed.
Event:
Annual Dinner Meeting
Date:
03/12/2014 6:00 pm
Cost:
$30
Category:
Organizer:
The University Seminars
Phone:
2128542389
univ.seminars@columbia.edu
Updated:
01/27/2014
Venue:
Faculty House
Phone:
2128542389
Address:
64 Morningside Drive, New York, NY, 10027, United States

The University Seminars
SEVENTIETH ANNUAL DINNER MEETING

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 2014


 Presentation of 

THE TANNENBAUM-WARNER AWARD
for exceptional service to the University Seminars

to

ROXIE R. SMITH

Followed by

THE TANNENBAUM LECTURE
“Fighting Inequality: The Road Ahead”

JOSEPH E. STIGLITZ


All Seminar members, guests, family, and friends are welcome; tickets must be purchased in advance. To make a reservation, please complete THIS FORM and return it to the University Seminars office with your check for the subsidized price of $30 per person no later than MARCH 6th. We will send you a confirmation email to let you know that payment has been received. When you arrive on the 12th, please sign in at the registration table. Parking requests can be made by emailing univ.seminars@columbia.edu no later than March 6th.


JOSEPH E. STIGLITZ is University Professor at Columbia University, the winner of the 2001 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics, and a lead author of the 1995 IPCC report, which shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He was chairman of the U.S. Council of Economic Advisers under President Clinton and chief economist and senior vice president of the World Bank for 1997-2000. Stiglitz received the John Bates Clark Medal, awarded annually to the American economist under 40 who has made the most significant contribution to the subject. He was a Fulbright Scholar at Cambridge University, held the Drummond Professorship at All Souls College Oxford, and has also taught at M.I.T, Yale, Stanford, and Princeton. He is the author most recently of The Price of Inequality: How Today’s Divided Society Endangers Our Future. In 2011, Time named him one of the world’s 100 most influential people.


ROXIE R. SMITH began her administrative career at the University of North Carolina, where she also received her Doctorate in Education and Social Policy. She continued her work in education in Chicago, including a dozen years as an associate dean and then associate provost at Northwestern University. She came to Columbia to work with David Cohen when he was appointed vice president for Arts and Sciences. Every department chair and many others came to rely on the two of them to know what was going on and respond sensibly and openly, if not always favorably, to their requests and needs. When Roxie became vice provost, the University Seminars became a curious part of her enormous job. Columbia managed the dedicated endowment the Seminars lived on, but they reported not to her, but to a General Committee, of which the provost is one among dozens of members. She loved the anomaly, because she understood that real administration involves people, not structures, and that the one thing that could destroy the Seminars was uniformity. Roxie served Columbia’s multitude of academic entities in ways that often went unnoticed, as she desired, but today, the Seminars rejoice in the chance to thank her for many years of counsel and support.