Events and Holidays

04/11/2018

74th Annual Dinner Meeting

Deadline extended until April 9th!

PLEASE RSVP

Please email the registration form to:univ.seminars@columbia.edu, or call the office at 212-854-2389 to let us know how many seats to reserve.


CLICK HERE FOR REGISTRATION FORM


“In Pursuit of Justice and Grace:

Reflections on the African-American

Literary Tradition”

This talk is drawn from my current project, In Pursuit of Justice and Grace: Reflections of the African American Literary Tradition. This book comes out of a lifetime of reading and over 25 years of teaching African American literature to explore how Black American writers address the ideals and failures of the U.S. experiment with democracy and speak to questions of love, death, justice, and mercy. In Pursuit of Justice and Grace marks an effort to share a series of valuable lessons from those who have sought to better a nation that depends upon, and yet too often, also despises them.

Farah Jasmine Griffin is the Director of the Institute for Research in African American Studies, the William B. Ransford Professor of English and Comparative Literature and African-American Studies at Columbia University, and Affiliate Faculty of the Center for Jazz Studies. Professor Griffin received her BA from Harvard in American History and Literature and her PhD in American Studies from Yale. Her major fields of interest are American and African American literature, music, and history. She has published widely on issues of race and gender, feminism, jazz, literature, and cultural politics. Griffin is the author of Who Set You Flowin?: The African American Migration Narrative (Oxford, 1995), Beloved Sisters and Loving Friends: Letters from Rebecca Primus of Royal Oak, Maryland, and Addie Brown of Hartford Connecticut, 1854-1868 (Alfred A. Knopf, 1999), If You Can’t Be Free, Be a Mystery: In Search of Billie Holiday (Free Press, 2001), and co-author, with Salim Washington, of Clawing at the Limits of Cool: Miles Davis, John Coltrane, and the Greatest Jazz Collaboration Ever (Thomas Dunne, 2008). Her most recent book is Harlem Nocturne: Women Artists and Progressive Politics During World War II (Basic Books, 2013). In collaboration with the late composer, pianist, Geri Allen and director, actor S. Epatha Merkerson, Griffen wrote the scripts for two theatrical projects: “Geri Allen and Friends Celebrate the Great Jazz Women of the Apollo,” with Lizz Wright, Dianne Reeves, Teri Lyne Carrington and others (Apollo Theater, May 2013), and “A Conversation with Mary Lou” featuring vocalist Carmen Lundy (Harlem Stage, March 2014; The John F. Kennedy Center, May 2016). Griffin’s essays and articles have appeared in Essence, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Nation, The Guardian, Harper’s Bazaar, Art Forum and numerous other publications. She is a devoted board member of The Brotherhood/ Sister-Sol, a Harlem-based organization that provides comprehensive, holistic and long-term support services to youth who range in age from eight to 22.

Gertrude Schaffner Goldberg, with Sheila Collins and Helen Lachs Ginsburg, are co-chairs of The University Seminar on Full Employment, Social Welfare, and Equity, which has been meeting since 1987. She is Professor Emerita of Social Work and Social Policy of Adelphi University School of Social Work. Goldberg holds a bachelor’s degree from Vassar College and a doctoral degree from Columbia University. Goldberg has edited and co-authored: The Feminization of Poverty: Only in America? (with Eleanor Kremen, Prager, 1990); America’s New Poor Law (with Sheila Collins, Apex Press, 2001); Diminishing Welfare: A Cross-National Study of Social Provision (with Marguerite G. Rosenthal, Auburn House, 2002); and Poor Women in Rich Countries: Feminization of Poverty over the Life Course (Oxford, 2010). In her books and articles Goldberg has been concerned with the scourge of unemployment and its solution—full employment, or what President Franklin Roosevelt deemed the first and “fundamental” economic right to living-wage work. In a recent book, When Government Helped: Learning from the Successes and Failures of the New Deal (with Sheila Collins, Oxford, 2014), Goldberg focused on the development of the American welfare state and the role of popular movements in furthering economic justice. Goldberg and her colleagues conceived and led two conferences under the auspices of The University Seminar on Full Employment, Social Welfare, and Equity: An Economic Bill of Rights for the 21st Century (Faculty House, 2013) and A New, New Deal for New York City and the United States (The New School, 2017). She is a co-founder and chair of the National Jobs for All Coalition. Additionally, Trudy and her husband, Architect Alan Goldberg, are avid collectors of Mexican folk art and recently donated their 1000-piece collection to the Mexican Museum of San Francisco.

 

Start: 04/11/2018 6:00 pm
End: 04/11/2018 6:00 pm
Venue: The Faculty House
Address:
64 Morningside Drive, New York, NY, 10027, United States

02/22/2018 – 02/22/2018

Of Prophets and Saints: Literary Traditions and “convivencia” in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia

 

 

Start: 02/22/2018
End: 02/22/2018
Address:
Madrid, Spain

02/09/2018

Germany Past and Present: A Conference in Honor of Volker Berghahn

Program

1:45–2:00 p.m.  REGISTRATION

2:00 p.m.  WELCOME

2:15 p.m.  KEYNOTE ADDRESS

 Paul Kennedy, Dilworth Professor of History, Yale University
“Der Primat der Innenpolitik: Volker Berghahn, Admiral Tirpitz, and the ‘Turn’ in the Historiography of Wilhelmine Germany”

3:15 p.m.   PANEL 1

Chair: Derek Bleyberg, Deputy Director Emeritus, International School, Berlin
Dagmar Herzog, Distinguished Professor of History, CUNY Graduate Center
“Bodies and Souls: Love and Death (and Religion), 1848–2018”
Margaret Crosby-ArnoldAdjunct Associate Research Scholar, History Department, Columbia University
“A Model for the Present:  Complex Diversity in the German Past, German Migration and the Rise of Pragmatic Abolitionism in the Atlantic World”
Jonathan Wiesen, Professor of History and Department Chair, Southern Illinois University
“Memory, Consumption, and the Transnational Turn: Research Trends in German History since the 1990s”

4:45–5:00 p.m.   BREAK

5:00 p.m.  PANEL 2

Chair: Marion Kaplan, Skirball Professor of Modern Jewish History, New York University
Mark Roseman, Pat Glazer Chair in Jewish Studies and Professor in History, University of Indiana
“Diagonal Reading: From Recasting the Ruhr to Rescued Lives
Jennifer Foray, Associate Professor of History, Purdue University
“Occupational Aftershocks: The Legacies of War, Imperialism, and Decolonization in the Twentieth Century”
Jeremy Eichler, Head of Classical Review Department, Boston Globe, and Visiting Fellow, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University
“Hearing Echoes: Reception History, the Musical Memorial and the Case of Alban Berg’s Violin Concerto”

6:15 p.m.   CONCLUDING REMARKS

Volker BerghahnSeth Low Professor of History Emeritus, Columbia University

6:30–7:30 p.m.  RECEPTION 


The conference is free but registration is required. Please email smk2209@columbia.edu to register.

Start: 02/09/2018 2:00 pm
End: 02/09/2018 2:00 pm
Venue: Faculty House, Columbia University
Address:
64 Morningside Drive, New York, 10027, United States

12/07/2017 – 12/07/2017

PRESENT PAST: TIME, MEMORY, AND THE NEGOTIATION OF HISTORICAL JUSTICE

The University Seminar on History, Redress, and Reconciliation

In considering the politics and policies of commemorating the past, this conference probes how public discourses about memory change over time. How has the passage of time changed the way memories of historical violence, atrocity and genocide are represented in the public sphere? In what ways do political, social and cultural forces influence, appropriate, or stifle these memories in different ways as the original event recedes into the more distant past? Related topics include the globalization of memory, and with it the increasing popularity of commemorative memorial practices. The proliferation of museums and memorials, the increase in confessional or memorial literature, and the surge of memory laws against Holocaust and genocide denial are some examples of the historical, cultural and legal phenomena that speak to questions of how individuals and communities remember. These modes of ‘making the past present’ speak not only to the passage of time and the forces of multidirectional memory, but also to the ways in which communities understand issues of justice and accountability, memory and amnesia, prevention and the culture of ‘never again’.

READ MORE

Start: 12/07/2017
End: 12/07/2017
Venue: IAB
Address:
420 W. 118th Street, New York

12/06/2017

Mid-Day Music

MUSIC PERFORMANCE PROGRAM

PRESENTS

MID-DAY MUSIC @ COLUMBIA

All Events are on Wednesdays at 1PM unless otherwise noted


December 6, Danny Kim, Hannah Ko, James Yang, piano trio


Mid-Day Music @ Columbia offers live music to a general audience, following the rendition established by Aaron Warner and Isidor Isaac Rabi, great lovers of music whose memory lives on at Faculty House.  Come join us in the Garden Room at Faculty House, where Students and Music Associates from Columbia University’s Music Performance Program will be showcased in an afternoon recital series.

FULL LISTING

Start: 12/06/2017 1:00 pm
End: 12/06/2017 1:00 pm
Venue: Faculty House, Garden Room 2
Address:
64 Morningside Drive

11/30/2017

HIV/AIDS in Narrative Memory Symposium

Led by advocates, clinicians, writers, artists, and poets active during the peak of the HIV/
AIDS crisis to today, we invite you to join our conversation about how we remember and
story the beginning of the epidemic to almost three decades later.

SPEAKERS

Susan Ball is a physician who has taken care of people with HIV/AIDS since 1992,
and whose book about her experience during the epidemic, Voices in the Band: A
doctor, her patients, and how AIDS care changed from doomed to hopeful, was
published in 2015.

Michael Broder is a poet living with HIV/AIDS. His recent book, This Life Now, was
a 2015 finalist for the Lambda Literary Award for Gay Poetry.
Edgar Rivera Colón is a medical anthropologist who teaches in the Narrative
Medicine program at Columbia, and who trains HIV/AIDS activists in communitybased
research methods.

MK Czerwiec aka “comic nurse,” is a nurse and graphic artist, 2016, Taking Turns:
Stories from HIV/AIDS Care Unit 371 is a graphic memoir of her experience as an
HIV/AIDS nurse during the 1990’s in Chicago.

Deloris Dockrey, Clinic Director for Hyacinth Health and Wellness Center, Hyacinth
AIDS Foundation in Newark, is a long time HIV advocate and a person living with
HIV.

Marcelo Maia is photographer living with HIV/AIDS . He is from Brazil and moved
to NYC in 1989 to study photography at the International Center of Photography.
His first photography book, Prometheus, was published in 1996 and he is working
on his second book, Eros.

Robert E. Penn, Jr. is a writer/producer and long-time activist for Black and gay
communities, who has lived with HIV/AIDS since 1982.

Drinks and Refreshments Will Be Served

Start: 11/30/2017 4:00 pm
End: 11/30/2017 4:00 pm
Venue: Faculty House
Address:
64 Morningside Drive

11/29/2017

Mid-Day Music

MUSIC PERFORMANCE PROGRAM

PRESENTS

MID-DAY MUSIC @ COLUMBIA

All Events are on Wednesdays at 1PM unless otherwise noted


November 29, Serina Chang, Jason Shu, Elena Ariza, piano trio


Mid-Day Music @ Columbia offers live music to a general audience, following the rendition established by Aaron Warner and Isidor Isaac Rabi, great lovers of music whose memory lives on at Faculty House.  Come join us in the Garden Room at Faculty House, where Students and Music Associates from Columbia University’s Music Performance Program will be showcased in an afternoon recital series.

FULL LISTING

Start: 11/29/2017 1:00 pm
End: 11/29/2017 1:00 pm
Venue: Faculty House, Garden Room 2
Address:
64 Morningside Drive

11/15/2017

Mid-Day Music

MUSIC PERFORMANCE PROGRAM

PRESENTS

MID-DAY MUSIC @ COLUMBIA

All Events are on Wednesdays at 1PM unless otherwise noted


November 15, Annie Nikunen, flute


Mid-Day Music @ Columbia offers live music to a general audience, following the rendition established by Aaron Warner and Isidor Isaac Rabi, great lovers of music whose memory lives on at Faculty House.  Come join us in the Garden Room at Faculty House, where Students and Music Associates from Columbia University’s Music Performance Program will be showcased in an afternoon recital series.

FULL LISTING

Start: 11/15/2017 1:00 pm
End: 11/15/2017 1:00 pm
Venue: Faculty House, Garden Room 2
Address:
64 Morningside Drive

11/08/2017

Mid-Day Music

MUSIC PERFORMANCE PROGRAM

PRESENTS

MID-DAY MUSIC @ COLUMBIA

All Events are on Wednesdays at 1PM unless otherwise noted


November 8, Lucia Ticho, cello


Mid-Day Music @ Columbia offers live music to a general audience, following the rendition established by Aaron Warner and Isidor Isaac Rabi, great lovers of music whose memory lives on at Faculty House.  Come join us in the Garden Room at Faculty House, where Students and Music Associates from Columbia University’s Music Performance Program will be showcased in an afternoon recital series.

FULL LISTING

Start: 11/08/2017 1:00 pm
End: 11/08/2017 1:00 pm
Venue: Faculty House, Garden Room 2
Address:
64 Morningside Drive

11/02/2017 – 11/02/2017

Two Revolutions and Beyond

University Seminar on Slavic History and Culture

 

The Bakhmeteff Archive and the Columbia University Slavic Department will hold an international conference, Two Revolutions and Beyond, on November 2-4, 2017.  The conference is both intended to open a broad discussion on the global influence of the two Russian Revolutions (February and October 1917) and to initiate a series of events commemorating the 100th anniversary of the two revolutions.  Organized by Tanya Chebotarev, Curator of the Bakhmeteff Archive of Russian and East European History and Culture of Columbia University, and Irina Reyfman, Professor of Russian Literature in the Columbia University Department of Slavic Languages and chair of the Bakhmeteff Faculty Committee, and sponsored by the Harriman Institute at Columbia University and The University Seminars, the conference will bring together literary scholars, historians, librarians, archivists, and members of the general public to discuss the written and printed legacy of the epoch that followed those historic events.

The conference will be accompanied by an exhibition at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library.  The exhibition and the conference have similar goals. The exhibition will celebrate the role and importance of Russian émigré collections in the United States, documenting their role in preserving records of the past, making them available for scholarship, and exploring their importance in area studies programs in American universities.  The conference will provide a forum for discussing scholarly achievements in the field of Russian studies and stimulate dialogues across institutional, national, and disciplinary boundaries.

FULL PROGRAM

Start: 11/02/2017
End: 11/02/2017
Venue: Butler Library
Address:
Room 203, Ground Floor