Leonard Hastings Schoff Memorial Lecture Series

ROBERT REMEZ

THE GOOD LISTENER: BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE CONSIDERS THE PERCEPTION OF SPEECH

I. THE GOOD LISTENER: BEING VERSATILE
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2015, 8 PM

II. THE GOOD LISTENER: BEING PERSONAL
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2015, 8 PM

III. THE GOOD LISTENER: BEING INTENTIONAL
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2015, 8 PM

All lectures are held in Faculty House, 64 Morningside Drive | Lectures are free and open to the public


Our talkative species occupies much of our time each day in conversation. Historical views of this loquaciousness often expressed singular interest in personal motive, asking: What could individuals hope to achieve with so much talk? How do aims shape expressions? It is hardly surprising that such abstract concerns were difficult to satisfy. In our technical era, scrutiny has turned to mechanism, and the psychological focus has been placed on cognitive resources: What must interlocutors know and be able to do in order to converse? These lectures consider some recent investigations that characterize the superb facility of the listener. In turn, the themes examine the perceptual versatility of listeners in recognizing spoken utterances despite limitless physical variation in expression; the perceptual effect of the uniqueness of each talker as an anatomical, social and personal source of speech; and, the consequences of the contrast between hearing and listening for psychological understanding and a mature neuroscience.


ROBERT E. REMEZ is Professor of Psychology at Barnard College, Columbia University, where he has taught since 1980. A native New Yorker, Robert was a Predoctoral Research Trainee at Haskins Laboratories in New Haven, and received the doctorate in 1978 from the University of Connecticut. He received the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1971 from Brandeis University. At Barnard, he has held an Ann Whitney Olin Chair, has been Chair of the Departments of Psychology and Sociology, and is presently Chair of the Columbia University Seminar on Language & Cognition. He is co-editor of the Handbook of Speech Perception, and was Associate Editor of the journals Perception & Psychophysics and the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance. In service to the research community, he was a member of the Committee of Visitors for the Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences of the National Science Foundation, and was a sitting member of the Communication Sciences Study Section of the Division of Research Grants and the Language and Communication Study Section of the Center for Scientific Review of the National Institutes of Health. He has been elected a Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America, the Association for Psychological Science, the American Psychological Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Psychonomic Society. The Speech Perception Lab in Milbank Hall has been supported by grants from the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and a longstanding grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders had its thirtieth anniversary in 2015.


PAST LECTURES

2014
Annette Insdorf
Director of Undergraduate Film Studies; Professor in the Graduate Film Program of the School of the Arts

2013
Paige West
Tow Professor of Anthropology, Barnard College and Columbia University

2012
Herbert Terrace

Professor of Psychology, Columbia University

2011
Robert L. Belknap
Professor Emeritus of Russian, Director Emeritus of The University Seminars, Columbia University

2010
Jean Howard
George Delacorte Professor in the Humanities
Staging History; Imagining the Nation

2009
Philip Kitcher

John Dewey Professor of Philosophy
Deaths in Venice:
The Case(s) of Gustav (von) Aschenbach

2007
Douglas Chalmers

Professor Emeritus of Political Science
Representative Government Without Representatives: Seven Reasons to Think Beyond Electing Executives and Lawmakers

2006
Boris Gasparov

Professor of Slavic Languages and Literature
The Early Romantic Roots of Theoretical Linguistics: Friedrich Shchlegel, Novalis, and Ferdinand De Saussure on Sign and Meaning

2005
Robert W. Hanning

Professor of English and Comparative Literature
Serious Play: Crises of Desire and Authority in the Poetry of Ovid, Chaucer, and Ariosto

2004
Lesley A. Sharp

Associate Professor of Anthropology and Sociomedical Sciences
Bodies, Commodities, Biotechnologies

2003
George Rupp

President, International Rescue Committee
Globilization Challenged: Conviction, Conflict, Community

2002
David Rosand
Meyer Schapiro Professor of Art History
The Invention of Painting in America

2001
Partha Chatterjee

Professor of Anthropology
The Politics of the Governed

2000
Lisa Anderson

Dean of the School of International and Public Affairs Professor of Political Science
The Scholar and the Practitioner: Perspectives
on Social Science and Public Policy

1999
Robert Pollack

Professor of Biological Sciences
The Faith of Biology and the Biology of Faith

1998
Carol Gluck
George Sansom Professor of History
Past Obsessions: War and Memory in the Twentieth Century

1997
Ira Katznelson

Ruggles Professor of Political Science and History Desolation and Enlightenment
Political Knowledge After the Holocaust, Totalitarianism, and Total War

1996
Kenneth T. Jackson
Jacques Barzun Professor of History and the Social Sciences
Gentleman’s Agreement: Political Balkanization and Social Inequality in America

1995
Saskia Sassen

Professor of Urban Planning
Losing Control? Sovereignty in an Age of Globalization

1994
Charles E. Larmore
Professor of Philosophy
The Romantic Legacy

1993
David N. Cannadine
Moore Collegiate Professor of History
The Rise and Fall of Class in Britain, 1700–2000