Seminars

  • Founded
    2011
  • Seminar Number
    749

Studies in Dance takes a broad, interdisciplinary approach to dance scholarship while serving as an ongoing forum for discussion by established and younger scholars.  The Seminar embraces all forms of dance scholarship, regardless of discipline, research area, and methodology, and has the long-term goal of encouraging academic publication and new research.  The members include Barnard College and Columbia University faculty as well as independent scholars and faculty from other New York institutions, although speakers may come from outside the metropolitan area.


Chair
Professor Lynn Garafola
lg97@columbia.edu

Rapporteur
Buck Wanner
brw2103@columbia.edu


Meeting dates and locations are subject to change. Please confirm details with the seminar rapporteur.


Meeting Schedule

09/23/2019 Faculty House, Columbia University
6:00 PM
Theatres of the Body: Science and Stage in Antebellum Philadelphia
Lynn Brooks, Franklin & Marshall College
Abstract

Abstract

As the young United States forged a distinct cultural profile between the War for Independence and the Civil War, the body – the human body – came increasingly under scrutiny: science, social practice, political contests, and theatrical representations all brought the body to the fore. This research investigates the intricate braiding of political, scientific, and danced representations of the body, focusing on antebellum Philadelphia, a city both representative of national trends and also distinct in its cultural position.





10/21/2019 Faculty House, Columbia University
6:00 PM
Movement’s Paradox: Culture, Politics, and Modern Dance in Germany, 1900-1935
Ana Isabel Keilson, Independent Scholar
Abstract

Abstract

This chapter draft, from my forthcoming manuscript entitled Movement’s Paradox: Culture, Politics, and Modern Dance in Germany, 1900-1935, examines the role of dance in the “Garden City” of Hellerau, Dresden from around 1905 to 1913. Specifically, it looks at how the Jaques-Dalcroze method and the activities of the Jaques-Dalcroze Institute located there came to be understood by a group of German social-liberal reformers as the key to a social order that would stay the effects of industrialization and revitalize a new kind of culture, rooted in the seamless marriage of aesthetics, politics, and economics.





11/18/2019 Faculty House, Columbia University
6:00 PM
Winin’ Through the Violence: Performing Carib[being]ness at the Brooklyn Carnival
Adanna Kai Jones, Bowdoin College
Abstract

Abstract

I will be discussing my forthcoming chapter called “Winin’ Through the Violence: Performing Carib[being]ness at the Brooklyn Carnival,” which will appear in the upcoming edited volume The Futures of Dance Studies. The chapter focuses on the use of winin' at the 2011 Labor Day Caribbean Carnival in Brooklyn. In particular, I am interested in deciphering the important affect and effect of dancing/winin' in the streets of Brooklyn vis-a-vis anti-black violence and continual mistrust between the NYPD and the Afro-Diasporic community of Crown Heights.





12/09/2019 Faculty House, Columbia University
6:00 PM
the contributions of Félix Fernández to the choreographic process of The Three-Cornered Hat
M. Gabriela Estrada, Independent Scholar
Abstract

Abstract

This session will address the contributions of the flamenco dancer Félix Fernández to the choreographic process of The Three-Cornered Hat. Through a biographical reconstruction of Félix’s life, this paper will amplify his legacy through documentation of his participation in the Ballets Russes as a dancer, clarifying discrepancies about his legend, documenting the artistic repertoire he has inspired, and highlighting his historic transcendence as an ambassador of flamenco in ballet





02/03/2020 Faculty House, Columbia University
6:00 PM
Bureaucratic Angling, Institutional Activism: The NEA’s Covert Culture Wars (1981-1996)
Sarah Wilbur, Duke University
Abstract

Abstract

NEA historians of the “Culture Wars”(1989-1996) frequently focus attention on the agency’s highly mediatized battles between legislators and arts constituencies. Such accounts, while important, do not square with longstanding struggles inside of the NEA Dance Program, where staff and citizen advisors responded to less visible demands for inclusion by historically overand historically under-represented groups. This paper delves beneath the smoke of the NEA’s harshest period of public battery to examine creative workarounds through which Dance insiders tooled existing funding infrastructures to variable political ends.





03/02/2020 Faculty House, Columbia University
6:00 PM
Connected Histories and New World Magics
VK Preston, University of Toronto (Canada)
Abstract

Abstract

This talk examines seventeenth-century archives for dance research, entangling early modern performance descriptions with accounts of North America. This study examines histories of race and colonization, dance, and contested sovereignty, studying histories of travel literature as well as fraud.





03/30/2020 Faculty House, Columbia University
6:00 PM
Vertigo and Dancing Revolutions in Europe
Elizabeth Claire, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (France)
Abstract

Abstract

This chapter concerns the role of the imagination in the pathology of vertigo in the period following the Revolutionary Terror when Napoleonic imperialism was at its zenith. The nationalization of waltz-vertigo as a French dilemma will be contextualized as a gendered sociopolitical phenomenon allowing physicians and moralists to link women's desires and ambitions [envies] to ancient medical concepts about the powers of the imagination in order to pathologize female empowerment just as bourgeois sociability came to invest new sites of social dancing throughout Europe.





04/27/2020 Faculty House, Columbia University
6:00 PM
the motion of Etruscan dress in dance
Audrey Gouy, Copenhagen University (Denmark) and University of Oxford (England, UK)
Abstract

Abstract

Audrey Gouy will present her MSCA research project and discuss her new article on the motion of Etruscan dress in dance. Indeed, it appears that Etruscan dress offers complementary information to the visual movements depicted, for example, in tomb paintings, allowing us to better understand the kind of dance movements represented and to identify specific moments of dance. The article will follow the 3D reconstruction of clothes' movements planned in 2019-2020
at Copenhagen and Oxford Universities.