Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience

  • Founded
    1986
  • Seminar Number
    603

For more than 100 years, comparative psychologists have sought to understand the evolution of human intelligence. New paradigms for studying cognitive processes in animals—in particular symbol use and memory—have, for the first time, allowed psychologists and neuroscientists to compare higher thought processes in animals and human beings.  New imaging approaches have also facilitated exploring the neural basis of behavior and both animals and humans.  Questions concerning the nature of animal and human cognition have defined the themes of this seminar whose members include specialists in cognition, ethology, philosophy and neuroscience.


Co-Chairs
Professor James Curley
jc3181@columbia.edu

Professor Herbert S. Terrace
terrace@columbia.edu

Rapporteur
Basak Akdogan
ba2496@columbia.edu


Meeting dates and locations are subject to change. Please confirm details with the seminar rapporteur.

Welcome

Meetings

09/22/2016 Faculty House, Columbia University
4:00 PM
What Freud got Right about Speech Errors
Gary S. Dell, University of Illinois
Abstract




Notes: Joint Meeting with the Seminar on Language and Cognition
10/20/2016 Faculty House, Columbia University
4:00 PM
Formal Monkey Semantics
Philippe Schlenker, New York University
Abstract




Notes: Joint Meeting with the Seminar on Language and Cognition
12/08/2016 Faculty House, Columbia University
4:00 PM

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01/26/2017 Faculty House, Columbia University
4:00 PM

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02/23/2017 Faculty House, Columbia University
4:00 PM

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03/23/2017 Faculty House, Columbia University
4:00 PM

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04/20/2017 Faculty House, Columbia University
4:00 PM

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05/11/2017 Faculty House, Columbia University
4:00 PM

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