Comparative Philosophy

  • Founded
    2007
  • Seminar Number
    721

The Comparative Philosophy Seminar seeks to advance constructive philosophical projects by bringing together scholars with training in diverse areas of Asian (mostly Buddhist) thought and Western Philosophy. Comparison in this context is not employed to loan authority to one set of obscure discoveries by revealing its resonances with the works of others, deemed less obscure. Nor does it sociologize philosophy in search of general laws of human cultural and intellectual development. Rather, the intent is to explicate, and employ, the fullness of an expanded philosophical toolset—and see how that works. The seminar ordinarily invites respondents who are versed in the relevant field of philosophical inquiry, but who are not necessarily specialists in Asian thought. In order to facilitate an ongoing conversation, seminar meetings for a given year are loosely organized around a very general theme, which speakers are asked to address when possible. In past years, the themes have been “Personal Identity” (2007–2008) and “Meta-Ethics” (2008–2009).


Co-Chairs
Professor Jonathan C. Gold
jcgold@princeton.edu

Professor Hagop Sarkissian
hagop.sarkissian@baruch.cuny.edu

Rapporteur
Daniel M. del Nido
dmd2167@columbia.edu

Welcome

Meetings

09/23/2016 Dept. of Religion, Columbia University (80 Claremont Ave., Room 101)
5:30 PM
Between Philosophy and History: The Challenge of Authorship to Classical Chinese Philosophy in the Western Academy
Tao Jiang, Rutgers University
Abstract

Respondent: Eske Møllgaard, University of Rhode Island



10/13/2016 Dept. of Religion, Columbia University (80 Claremont Ave., Room 101)
5:30 PM
Death and Self in the Incomprehensible Zhuangzi
Eric Schwitzgebel, University of California, Riverside
Abstract

Respondent: Christopher Gowans, Fordham University



11/11/2016 Dept. of Religion, Columbia University (80 Claremont Ave., Room 101)
5:30 PM
Pre-Qin Chinese Thought as a Modern Political Philosophy
Tongdong Bai, Fudan University
Abstract

Respondent: Viren Murthy, University of Wisconsin-Madison



12/02/2016 Dept. of Religion, Columbia University (80 Claremont Ave., Room 101)
5:30 PM
The Madman of Chu: The Problem of Mental Illness and Self-Cultivation in Early Chinese Texts
Alexus McLeod, University of Connecticut
Abstract




02/02/2017 Dept. of Religion, Columbia University (80 Claremont Ave., Room 101)
5:30 PM
Who Wrote the Trisvabhāvanirdeśa? Reflections on an Enigmatic Text and Its Place in the History of Buddhist Philosophy
Matthew Kapstein, University of Chicago and École pratique des hautes études
Abstract

Respondent: Jay Garfield, Smith College and Harvard Divinity School



02/24/2017 Dept. of Religion, Columbia University (80 Claremont Ave., Room 101)
5:30 PM
Self-Cultivation Philosophy as an Interpretive Framework: The Critique of Desire
Christopher Gowans, Fordham University
Abstract

Respondent: Bryan van Norden, Vassar College



03/31/2017 Dept. of Religion, Columbia University (80 Claremont Ave., Room 101)
5:30 PM
The Daoist Dialectic of Enlightenment
Gary Ostertag, The Graduate Center, CUNY and Nassau Community College
Abstract

Respondent: Graham Priest, The Graduate Center, CUNY



05/05/2017 Dept. of Religion, Columbia University (80 Claremont Ave., Room 101)
5:30 PM

Warren Frisina, Hofstra University