Seminars

  • Founded
    2001
  • Seminar Number
    689

This Seminar addresses the legacy of slavery in the western hemisphere, focusing on African-American slavery in the United States.  Presenters and discussants participate in dialogue on the history of slavery, its neurobehavioral and cultural underpinnings, the social, economic, and political factors facilitating ongoing racism and inequities, and the consequences for ancestors of enslaved peoples and enslaving peoples in the modern world.  Members of this seminar include anthropologists, clergy, historians, neuroscientists, psychologists, sociologists, and other scholars and guests who share an interest in learning from the collective memories of slavery, determining what must be done to heal the wounds left behind by slavery, and determining how to move toward equitable and healthy societies in which all peoples can thrive.


Chair
John Delfs
jrdelfs@gmail.com

Rapporteur
Keli Safia Maksud
ksm2173@columbia.edu


Meeting dates and locations are subject to change. Please confirm details with the seminar rapporteur.


Meeting Schedule

09/26/2019 Faculty House, Columbia University
12:00 PM
Teaching ‘race’ and racism to undergraduate students at Columbia and Barnard (1989-2005): the rise and fall of a ‘Core’ course outside the Core Curriculum
Robert Henning, Columbia University
Abstract

Abstract

This is the story of how a medievalist and longtime member of the Columbia Faculty was unexpectedly driven by campus events to conceive, design, and teach (for over fifteen years) an undergraduate lecture-discussion course called “’Race’ and racism: literary representations of an American crisis.” The course was designed as the equivalent of a course in Columbia College’s required Core Curriculum; that is, it was intended primarily, though not exclusively, for students in their first two years of college, it involved intense close reading and discussion of texts and documents considered important by the instructor, and the instructor was not a specialist in the field of Race Studies. Although the Core Curriculum is an important part of the Columbia College curriculum (and, as such, subject to certain dangers in its presentation and instruction), the course welcomed undergraduates from every school in the University.





10/24/2019 Faculty House, Columbia University
12:00 PM
Race and Racism through the Lens of Literature
Robert Hanning, Columbia University




11/21/2019 Faculty House, Columbia University
12:00 PM
Images Of Race, Class, and Gender Discrimination In Recent Brazilian Film, Television, and The Internet
Esther Hamburger, University of São Paulo (Brazil) and Columbia University

Carlos Augusto Calil, University of São Paulo (Brazil) and Columbia University
Abstract

Abstract

Using video excerpts from the films News from a Private War (Notícias de uma guerra particular, dir: Katia Lund & João Moreira Sales, 1999), City of God (Cidade de Deus, dir: Katia Lund & Fernando Meirelles, 2002), and White out, Black in (Adirley Queirós, 2014), Professors Hamburger and Calil will suggest the ways in which film captures, and expresses ongoing political and aesthetic debates about how to frame discrimination without reinforcing discrimination.




12/19/2019 Faculty House, Columbia University
12:00 PM

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01/16/2020 Faculty House, Columbia University
12:00 PM

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02/27/2020 Faculty House, Columbia University
12:00 PM

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03/26/2020 Faculty House, Columbia University
12:00 PM

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