Seminars

  • Founded
    2010
  • Seminar Number
    735

“Sites of Cinema” takes a new approach to the question of cinema at the moment when cinema is said to be in decline, even in some accounts said to be facing its “death.” At this moment, when are focused on a convergence of moving image forms into a single delivery system we take up divergence over convergence, a divergence. Alternative to André Bazin’s question “What is Cinema?” “Sites of Cinema” will ask “Where is Cinema?” Where has it been seen to be and where will it be spaced in the future—as theoretical construct, national culture, material object, artistic work, social practice and space of exhibition. Cinema has moved and is still moving—from theatrical stages to museum walls, in and on buildings as well as within historical nations and regions of the world. “Sites of Cinema” signals our interest in site-specific cinemas plural but also cinema as a total apparatus—the “cinema of the mind” for the mass audience.


Co-Chairs
Professor Nico Baumbach
nb2428@columbia.edu

Professor Jane Gaines
jmg2196@columbia.edu

Rapporteur
Carlos Gutierrez Aza
ceg2202@columbia.edu


All seminars will continue to meet virtually through February 2022. Meeting links provided upon RSVP. Meeting dates and times are subject to change.

Meeting Schedule

10/07/2021 Online Meeting
7:00 PM
Black on Both Sides: Film, Media, and the Art of Blackness
Michael Boyce Gillespie, City College, CUNY
Abstract

Abstract

Focusing on recent works, new curatorial practices, and a concentration on visual historiography and collectivity, Gillespie will present new research and propositions for understanding black visual and expressive culture. The talk will expand on the work of film blackness by considering a continued conceptual insistence on the study of black film and media with attention to form and content.


Respondent: Paula J. Massood, Brooklyn College, CUNY



10/21/2021 Online Meeting
7:00 PM
Hysterical Laughter in the Throat of Capitalist Film Modernity
Maggie Hennefeld, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
Abstract

Abstract

Women laughed their heads off at the movies. “Laugh? Why, you’ll have to tie them to the seats so that they won’t roll all over the house in fits of convulsive laughter,” declared The Moving Picture World in 1912. This paper explores the raucous social potentials and ruthless capitalist incentives for women’s hysterical explosion into laughing modernity. Working comparatively between early film historiography and feminist/anti-capitalist affect theory, I pursue the head-on collision between laughter and hysteria—commoditized enjoyment and spectacle-based madness—as female Medusan revelers and gaslit “clownist” hysterics assumed the same convulsive bodies. Their unholy conjoinment, I argue, sheds light on the present-day crises of neoliberal enjoyment and dystopian carnival via the archives of hysterical movie laughter.


Respondent: Claudia Breger, Columbia University



11/18/2021 Online Meeting
7:00 PM
meeting postponed
,




12/09/2021 Online Meeting
7:00 PM
meeting postponed
,